Lipoprotein (a)

Lp(a) is a genetic independent risk factor for heart disease. Knowing your Lp(a) levels can help you reduce your risk of heart disease for you or someone you love.

Learn about Lp(a)

Many people don’t have symptoms. You could have a high Lp(a) even if you have a healthy lifestyle and all other heart disease risk factors are controlled. Talk with your health care professional about screening if you have:

  • Known family history of high Lp(a)
  • Family or personal history of heart disease or premature cardiovascular disease
  • Diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an inherited condition that causes the body to poorly recycle LDL or bad cholesterol

What is Lp(a)?

What is Lp(a)? downloadable

Get an overview of Lp(a).

Understanding the Lp(a) Test

Understanding the Lp(a) Test downloadable

Download this one-page fact sheet.

Understanding My Lp(a) Risk

Understanding my Lp(a) Risk downloadable

Find questions to ask your doctor about Lp(a).

Lp(a) FAQ

Knowledge is power. Find answers to your questions about Lp(a). 

What is lipoprotein (a)?

Often referred to as Lp(a), lipoprotein (a) is a type of lipoprotein that is genetically inherited and in high levels is a common independent risk factor for heart disease.

How common is high Lp(a)?

About 1 in 5 people worldwide have high Lp(a).

Should I know my Lp(a) number?

Talk to your health care professional about screening if you have:

  • Known family history of high Lp(a).
  • Family or personal history of heart disease or premature cardiovascular disease.
  • Diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an inherited condition where the body poorly recycles LDL cholesterol. 

How do I get my Lp(a) tested?

Talk to your health care professional about ordering a simple blood test for you.

My family member has a high Lp(a),
should I get tested?

Yes, if you have a known family history of high Lp(a), talk to your health care professional about getting a simple blood test ordered.

What is a high Lp(a) number?

Greater than or equal to 125 nmol/L (or ≥ 50 mg/dL) equates to an increased risk of a heart attack or stroke.

How can I lower my Lp(a)?

Although Lp(a) is not affected by lifestyle changes, it is still important to lower your overall risk of heart attack and stroke including eating a healthy diet, being physically active, maintaining a healthy weight, stopping tobacco use and getting enough sleep. It’s also important to take medications as prescribed.

Are there symptoms with high Lp(a)?

Many people don’t have symptoms. You could have a high Lp(a) and have all other heart disease related risk factors controlled.

Understanding Lp(a)

How does Lp(a) impact my health?

High Lp(a) numbers promote clotting and inflammation, significantly increasing risk of heart attack, stroke, aortic stenosis and peripheral artery disease.

Heart & Stroke Helper App

Download the Heart & Stroke Helper app to help manage your cholesterol.

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Novartis is proud to support the American Heart Association’s Lp(a) Awareness and Testing Initiative.