Pork Tenderloin with Greens

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Pork Tenderloin with Greens

Pork tenderloin is a lean meat so it cooks quickly, allowing you to have this dish on the table in about 30 minutes. For a complete meal, serve the pork and greens over brown rice or other whole grain, which will easily soak up the delicious sauce.

Ingredients

Servings   6  

  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 pound pork tenderloin, all visible fat discarded, cut into slices (about 1 inch thick)
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth and 1 tablespoon fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth, divided use
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard (about 6 to 8 cups depending on the size of the bunch), stems separated from leaves, chopped into ¾-inch pieces, or other greens (see Tip)
  • 3 tablespoons raisins
  • 2 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • Cooking spray
  • 3 tablespoons slivered almonds, dry-roasted

Directions

Tip: Click on step to mark as complete.

  1. Put the flour and pepper in a large resealable plastic bag, sealing tightly and shaking to combine. Add the pork, shaking well to coat. Transfer the pork to a plate. Set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the balsamic vinegar and ¼ cup broth. Set aside.
  3. In a heavy large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat for 1 minute, swirling to coat the bottom. Cook the stems for 5 minutes.
  4. Stir in the leaves. Cook for 3 minutes. Stir in the raisins, garlic, and remaining 1 tablespoon broth. Cook, covered, for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the greens are wilted.
  5. Meanwhile, lightly spray a separate heavy large skillet with cooking spray. Cook the pork on medium heat for 2 minutes on each side, or until browned and tender. Also, check that the pork registers 145˚F on an instant-read thermometer. Transfer the pork to a large platter or plates.
  6. In the same skillet, bring the vinegar mixture to a boil over medium-high heat for 3 to 4 minutes, or until about half the liquid evaporates, whisking constantly. Drizzle over the pork.
  7. Sprinkle the almonds over the greens. Serve with the pork.

Cooking Tip: To dry-roast nuts, heat them in a skillet over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Keep it Healthy: If your prefer, you can substitute another green, such as spinach or collards, for the Swiss chard. The spinach will cook quickly; the collards will take longer to become tender. If using collards, be sure to discard the stems. You can save the stems for homemade stock. Cook as directed. If the greens are too bitter, add a dash of vinegar or lemon juice. Drizzle with red hot-pepper sauce or sprinkle with crushed red pepper flakes, if desired.

Nutrition Facts

Pork Tenderloin with Greens

CaloriesCalories

280 Per Serving

ProteinProtein

25g Per Serving

FiberFiber

3g Per Serving

Cost Per ServingCost Per Serving

$3.21

Nutrition Facts

Calories 280
Total Fat 13 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 7.5 g
Cholesterol 60 mg
Sodium 144 mg
Total Carbohydrate 18 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Sugars 9 g
Protein 25 g

Dietary Exchanges
1/2 fruit, 1 fat, 1/2 other carbohydrate, 3 lean meat

 

Pork tenderloin is a lean meat so it cooks quickly, allowing you to have this dish on the table in about 30 minutes. For a complete meal, serve the pork and greens over brown rice or other whole grain, which will easily soak up the delicious sauce.

Nutrition Facts

Pork Tenderloin with Greens

CaloriesCalories

280 Per Serving

ProteinProtein

25g Per Serving

FiberFiber

3g Per Serving

Cost Per ServingCost Per Serving

$3.21
×
Calories 280
Total Fat 13 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.0 g
Monounsaturated Fat 7.5 g
Cholesterol 60 mg
Sodium 144 mg
Total Carbohydrate 18 g
Dietary Fiber 3 g
Sugars 9 g
Protein 25 g

Dietary Exchanges
1/2 fruit, 1 fat, 1/2 other carbohydrate, 3 lean meat

Ingredients

Servings   6  

  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 pound pork tenderloin, all visible fat discarded, cut into slices (about 1 inch thick)
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth and 1 tablespoon fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth, divided use
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard (about 6 to 8 cups depending on the size of the bunch), stems separated from leaves, chopped into ¾-inch pieces, or other greens (see Tip)
  • 3 tablespoons raisins
  • 2 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • Cooking spray
  • 3 tablespoons slivered almonds, dry-roasted

Directions

Tip: Click on step to mark as complete.

  1. Put the flour and pepper in a large resealable plastic bag, sealing tightly and shaking to combine. Add the pork, shaking well to coat. Transfer the pork to a plate. Set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the balsamic vinegar and ¼ cup broth. Set aside.
  3. In a heavy large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat for 1 minute, swirling to coat the bottom. Cook the stems for 5 minutes.
  4. Stir in the leaves. Cook for 3 minutes. Stir in the raisins, garlic, and remaining 1 tablespoon broth. Cook, covered, for 1 to 2 minutes, or until the greens are wilted.
  5. Meanwhile, lightly spray a separate heavy large skillet with cooking spray. Cook the pork on medium heat for 2 minutes on each side, or until browned and tender. Also, check that the pork registers 145˚F on an instant-read thermometer. Transfer the pork to a large platter or plates.
  6. In the same skillet, bring the vinegar mixture to a boil over medium-high heat for 3 to 4 minutes, or until about half the liquid evaporates, whisking constantly. Drizzle over the pork.
  7. Sprinkle the almonds over the greens. Serve with the pork.

Cooking Tip: To dry-roast nuts, heat them in a skillet over medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Keep it Healthy: If your prefer, you can substitute another green, such as spinach or collards, for the Swiss chard. The spinach will cook quickly; the collards will take longer to become tender. If using collards, be sure to discard the stems. You can save the stems for homemade stock. Cook as directed. If the greens are too bitter, add a dash of vinegar or lemon juice. Drizzle with red hot-pepper sauce or sprinkle with crushed red pepper flakes, if desired.

 


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