hidden Four Easy Steps to Take your Pulse

Four Easy Steps to Take your Pulse

If you think you might have an irregular or rapid heartbeat, check your pulse. The AFib Alliance offers four easy steps to take your pulse: Sit down for five minutes before checking your pulse and have a watch or clock with a second hand available. Extend your hand palm up with your elbow bent slightly.

hidden Brain Attack Fact Sheet 2018

Brain Attack Fact Sheet 2018

What is Stroke? A stroke is a “brain attack.” It can happen to anyone at any time. It occurs when an artery to the brain is either blocked or it bursts. As a result, part of the brain does not get the blood that it needs, so it starts to die. When brain cells die,

hidden Financing Your Technology Guide

Financing Your Technology Guide

Interested in learning more about how to pay for technologies that can support your stroke recovery? This fact sheet provides a starting point for your research. The most important tip: Be Persistent! Spanish Version

hidden Goal Setting Worksheet

Goal Setting Worksheet

Unsure how to start your process for returning to work? Start by setting some goals for yourself. This worksheet can help. Objectives What would it take to accomplish this goal? What are the next steps towards these goals? Who is the most logical person to take each step? Who else do we need to get

hidden Recovery after Stroke: Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep Disorders

Recovery after Stroke: Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep Disorders

Diagnosing Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Although you may experience the symptoms that suggest OSA, often times, it is your bed partner or family member who notices your sleep problem. You should talk to your doctor if you think you may be experiencing symptoms of OSA. To officially diagnose the problem, your doctor may arrange a

hidden Atrial Fibrillation and Anticoagulants Facts Sheet

Atrial Fibrillation and Anticoagulants Facts Sheet

When you have Atrial Fibrillation or AFib, your risk of stroke increases. The condition causes blood to pool in the atria, the heart’s upper chambers, due to an irregular heartbeat. These pools increase the risk of blood clots that can cause a stroke. The most common medication used to manage AFib is an anticoagulant. ©

hidden Recovery After Stroke: Managing Fatigue

Recovery After Stroke: Managing Fatigue

Post-stroke fatigue is a common complaint. It is known by the medical profession to affect 30-70% of survivors. It can affect moving, emotions and thinking and does not seem to respond to rest. Learn more about what you can do if you are experiencing post-stroke fatigue.

hidden Reducing Risk and Recognizing Symptoms

Reducing Risk and Recognizing Symptoms

Stroke is a “brain attack” cutting off vital blood and oxygen to the brain cells that control everything we do – from speaking, to walking, to breathing. Most strokes occur when arteries are blocked by blood clots or by the gradual build-up of plaque and other fatty deposits. Some strokes can be caused by arteries

hidden Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) and Stroke

Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) and Stroke

It is important to manage personal risk and know how to recognize and respond to stroke signs and symptoms. In order to view the fact sheets, you need to have Adobe Reader installed on your computer (download Adobe Reader). © 2016

hidden Healthy Eating Fact Sheet

Healthy Eating Fact Sheet

Eating healthy plays a big role in lowering the risk of stroke—get the facts and learn how to get started. What is healthy eating? Healthy eating means eating a diet that is high in nutrients and low in fat, sugars, and sodium. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, a healthy eating plan includes:

hidden Cholesterol and Stroke

Cholesterol and Stroke

High cholesterol may raise your risk for stroke by increasing your risk for heart disease, a stroke risk factor. Learn what you can do to manage your cholesterol. In order to view the fact sheets, you need to have Adobe Reader installed on your computer (download Adobe Reader). © 2016

hidden Driving After Stroke

Driving After Stroke

Check with your physician and/or occupational therapist to see if it is safe for you to get behind the wheel of a car again. A driving rehabilitation specialist can assess your ability to safely resume driving, as well as give you suggestions for car mobility equipment. Mobility equipment can be easily installed to help you

hidden Spasticity Infographic

Spasticity Infographic

Although there is no cure for spasticity, through a combination of treatments and therapies, people who experience the symptoms of spasticity may be able to return to their normal daily routines. Untreated spasticity can lead to increased disability, increased burden on caregivers and many other complications. Learn more about the symptoms, management strategies and treatment