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Paralysis

Paralysis or the inability of a muscle to move is one of the most common disabilities resulting from stroke. As many as 9 out of 10 stroke survivors have some degree of paralysis immediately following a stroke. Continued rehabilitation and therapy can help stroke survivors regain voluntary movement even years following their stroke.

What is Paralysis?

Paralysis is the inability of a muscle or group of muscles to move voluntarily. Muscles are controlled by messages sent from the brain that trigger movement. When part of the brain is damaged after a stroke, messaging between the brain and muscles may not work properly.

Paralysis is usually on the side of the body opposite the side of the brain damaged by stroke, and may affect any part of the body. You may experience one-sided paralysis, known as hemiplegia, or one-sided weakness, known as hemiparesis. Locked-in syndrome is an example of severe paralysis that leaves the stroke survivor unable to move any muscles except those that control the eyes.

Post-stroke paralysis symptoms may include but are not limited to:

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