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How to Get Involved in Clinical Trials

Register NowProgram Date: Jan. 29, 2015

Time: 1 p.m. EST

This activity is provided by National Stroke Association.

Program Overview

Have you or your facility ever participated in a clinical trial? Have you wondered about what's involved, what the benefits are or how to recruit and retain participants? Joins us for a live webinar and learn about the importance of clinical trials and how you can get involved.

Purpose Statement

To educate learners on post-stroke clinical trial education and training and patient enrollment through patient education and awareness. There will be challenges with a very stringent diagnostic pathway and there is still the need to correctly identify the key post-stroke provider disciplines (PRC vs. neurologists, etc.)

Agenda

ESUS (or non-lacunar cryptogenic stroke) diagnostic pathway evaluations

  • Understanding the target patient population
  • Importance of completing evaluations in timely manner
  • Which diagnostic procedures and why?  
  • What type of CV monitoring – inpatient telemetry vs. longer term event monitoring
  • TEE vs. TTE
  •  Imaging techniques – intracranial/extracranial arteries
  • Managing elective and emergent surgery and ICH including patient (and trialist) concerns

Challenges in recruiting/retaining ESUS patients for long-term secondary stroke prevention trials

  • Inpatient vs. outpatient  enrollment  (patient concerns,  operational challenges, etc.)
  • Targeting the right patient for long-term trials (e.g., patient retention, trial fatigue, etc.)
  • Strategies for retaining patients in long-term secondary stroke prevention trials
  • Working with rehab facilities

Goals and Learning Objectives

The goal of the Exploring Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Secondary Prevention After Embolic Stroke of Uncertain Source initiative is to educate healthcare professionals with patient enrollment in the clinical trial through patient education and awareness.  

Through participation in this activity, learners should be able to:

  • Identify patients with embolic stroke of uncertain source (ESUS).
  • Explain ESUS patient evaluation and diagnostic procedures for long-term secondary stroke prevention trials.
  • Discuss recruitment of ESUS patients for long-term secondary stroke prevention trials.
  • Describe strategies for retaining ESUS patients in long-term secondary stroke prevention trials.

Target Audience

The target audience for the Exploring Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Secondary Prevention After Embolic Stroke of Uncertain Source education initiative will target healthcare professionals that are looking for guidance with enrolling patients.

For questions regarding this activity, please contact National Stroke Association at professionaled@stroke.org.

Participation

This live program is designed for individual participation. Each individual must register for the event and complete an evaluation. There are no fees for participating in and receiving credit for this activity.

Content Developed and Presented By

Jeff Saver, MD, FAHA, FAAN, FANA
Director, Comprehensive Stroke Center
UCLA Medical Center
Santa Monica, California

Melissa Bollinger, RN, BSN, MBA
Administrative Director, Neurosciences
Christiana Care Health System
Wilmington, Delaware
 

The content managers reported the following financial relationships with commercial interests whose products or services may be mentioned in this activity:

Michelle Murdock, National Stroke Association                  No financial relationships to disclose

The “Exploring Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Secondary Prevention After Embolic Stroke of Uncertain Source” activity is supported by an educational grant from Boehringer Ingelheim, Inc.

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