Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Kyle R.
Kyle R.
Survivor

Amy O.


Survivor

I’ve had 8 brain and spinal surgeries from an unknown ruptured brain aneurysm that happened just after I got married in 1996. The first surgery was to clip the bleed then I needed another to insert a shunt. I spent a total of 9 weeks in the hospital.

Probably the hardest thing to deal with was the bleed paralyzed a vocal cord leaving me without a voice. I would have a vocal cord implant a year later and my voice is great now. At the time of the bleed I was working as a news anchor/reporter for the ABC affiliate in Ft Myers Florida. I would have to wait about a year before having the implant. I went back to work afterwards and was ok for a couple of years. But then the shunt started malfunctioning so I would need more surgery. I would have three shunt revisions within a four month period. It was soon discovered a golf ball sized cyst was pressing on the shunt causing it to malfunction. Doctors would find it and puncture it.

Everything was fine for a few years until I started having trouble with my right hand. It felt numb and I just couldn’t use it. A trip to my GP ended up in a carpal tunnel diagnosis. But when the headaches started I went to my neurosurgeon. He diagnosed me with a syrinx in my spine the result of chiari malformation. Chiari is when the brain sags into the spinal canal-people with it often say they have too much brain to contain. I was decompressed and am just doing Ok today.

I am in extreme pain most days and I use a cane to get around. But I’m great otherwise. I work, I drive, I can do just about anything I want. It hasn’t been an easy road by far but I am surviving and doing the best I can!!!

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo