Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Elizabeth H.
Elizabeth H.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Isador R.


Family

Monitor Your Stroke Survivor's Condition

My almost 91-year-old father, Isador Rosovsky, had survived several strokes from over 18 years ago (both two major and probably numerous TIAs) but sadly suffered a fatal one while in the hospital in July 2012. Through careful monitoring of his myriad medical problems and medications over the years (and doing our best to limit his stays in the hospital), it was wonderful that he had not had another major stroke in all that time.

But a hip fracture in 2010 created additional complications and the exacerbation of heart, kidney and cognitive problems. He amazingly improved considerably under treatment for Alzheimers, and was out of his wheelchair, improving in physical therapy, going to a wonderful eldercare program at the Samuel Field Y, talking to old friends, and playing music once again (he had been a musician and music teacher).

A return to the hospital for a Urinary Tract Infection led to other complications (C Diff and then sepsis) and although he seemed to be recovering slowly, he had a third major stroke overnight (while sedated to make him more comfortable and help him sleep).

By the time we realized what had happened the next morning, it was too late for the doctors to do anything. He died peacefully five days later with my sister and me by his side.

Please make sure you carefully monitor your stroke survivor's condition repeatedly, to ensure that if they have had another stroke, you can at least try to use the therapies available within the first 3 - 4.5 hours.

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo