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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Lauren C.
Lauren C.
Survivor

Lori K.
Lori K.
Survivor

Liane W.
Liane W.
Survivor

Wendy B.


Survivor

My name is Wendy, I am 33 years old.  I have no risk factors for a stroke.  I do not have high blood pressure, do not take birth control pills, do not smoke, and do not have mirgaines. I was in perfect health.  Then I had a TIA.

The evening of Wednesday May 9, 2012 was normal night in our household. My husband was at work till 11pm and I was getting our children ready for bed. I was suddenly nauseous and a stomach ache. I left my children in my room while went into the bathroom. After sitting for a few minutes I had a very intense dizzy spell, I got up to go and lay back on my bed and was so off balance I was hanging onto the walls for dear life. My 9 year old son had asked me what was wrong and I told him to "Call Daddy" only he couldn't understand me and I couldn't understand me. I tried several more times and finally my son asked "Mommy whats wrong with you are you dying?" I somehow got to the kitchen and handed him my cell phone which he then figured out I wanted him to call Daddy, I mean while 911 my first few seconds on the phone I know the 911 operator couldn't understand me but my speech started to come back and I was able to give the correct information for an ambulance to be sent to my house. By the time the ambulance arrived I was feeling fine just a slight headache. I almost refused to go to the hospital but my husband, who made his 2 minute drive from work to the house in 1 minute, told me to go.

At the ER I had a CatScan of the head and bloodwork done immediately. While waiting to find out the results I had another intense episode of dizziness so bad I started vomiting. I was told by the ER doctor it looked like I was experiencing vertigo I was given Mexclizine, Zofran, and Tordal and was told they would observe me for a few more hours and send me home. A few hours later when I was awake and more aware I talked to the doctor again and was going to send me home with the diagnosis of vertigo and asked "what about my speech diffculties?" So we talked a bit more and it was decided that I should be admitted.

Two hours later I had a MRI of the Brain, EchoCardiogram, Bubble Study, and a Carotid Ultrasound. The MRI showed multiple infarcts on both sides of my cerebellar hemispheres the right greater then the left. A cardiologist was also consulted because my echocardiogram was inconclusive because of the bone structures of my ribcage so he ordered a TransEsophogeal Endoscopy. This showed a very small PFO (hole between the two upper chambers of the heart). I was told it was possible a blood clot slipped through the hole and traveled to my brain. I also had a CT ANGIO of the neck vessels and that was clear. I was released from the hospital that Friday evening May 11.

I also had a lot of bloodwork done that showed a possible Protein C deficiency. Now 2 weeks later I show no signs of a TIA, MiniStroke, or Stroke (the terms have been interchanged so much I am not sure what to call it. My doctors are still going back on forth between the PFO causing the TIA or the clotting disorder.

I am very lucky that I had no lasting effects from the TIA. My first Neuroexam at the hospital was normal. The only thing I deal with now is the fear of it happening again. My family and I try not to let it overcome us and maybe in time I won't be as afraid but for now things are good.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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