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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Lauren C.
Lauren C.
Survivor

Lori K.
Lori K.
Survivor

Liane W.
Liane W.
Survivor

Stu E.


Survivor

I’m not quite 65 years old, and I look at least ten years younger. I’m relatively thin, I’m a vegetarian, I never smoked, I enjoy exercising (something I do four or five times a week), I have relatively low blood pressure, AND I’ve already had two strokes.

I have a family history of coronary heart disease. I’ve been on a statin for several years. Nonetheless, after my first stroke at age 59, the cardiologist increased my daily regimen. In addition, I began to take another medicine.

Four years later, I had my second stroke. Interestingly, I was unaware that a stroke was ensuing. I was with my wife when my ability to walk was somewhat compromised. I knew “something” was wrong. We went to a nearby hospital and entered the emergency room. The triage nurse asked me when my symptoms began; it was now noon. I told the nurse that I started feeling a bit wobbly around 8 a.m. When she asked me why it took me so long to get to the hospital, my wife chimed in, “Denial!”

I was in the hospital for about four days, being treated by a neurologist. I had the standard MRI and MRA as well as various other tests. Also, another medicine was now prescribed. I would chuckle, as just about every nurse who came to see me while I was in my bed at the hospital bed would say, “What are you doing here?” I was surrounded by patients who didn’t look well, but I appeared to be a perfect physical specimen.

It’s now one year since my second stroke. I’ve been re-evaluated without any changes being noted.
I consider myself to be lucky. 
I have no dexterity problems. No speech pathology and I’m still alive.


 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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