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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Kyle R.
Kyle R.
Survivor

Lanet W.


Survivor

I will never forget the 26th day of February 2006

My life changed that day...I woke up with the worst headache of my life. I was extremely sensitive to light and sound. My family has a history of migraines and I have had them for years so I thought was just another one of my everyday headaches. Don't let anyone tell you it's just a migraine.

I had gotten to work, sat at my desk and was starting my daily routine I remember looking to my left and then turning back to my computer I suddenly felt lightheaded. I even remember thinking "woah, that's weird." Immediately I started feeling sick to my stomach, I got up and started to walk but I ran into the wall, my balance was not right. I called my boss and told him how I was feeling and asked to take off to go to the hospital. I then called my daughter to drive me there. I had to have my daughter and my boss help me to the car because I felt real strange. My boss said "I hope you are not trying to have a stroke on us" which was exactly what was happening.

The closest hospital was 20 miles but it is a small hospital and I thought I would try to make it the 60 miles to a bigger hospital (plus when I called the hospital the nurse reccomended that was what I did) but, by the time we drove the 20 miles I told my daughter "I can't make it we are going to have to stop here!" I went into the E.R. I was off balance bad, kept running into the wall, had a terrible headache, the nurse took me in a room and took my blood pressure (which was sky high) then left the room. It took a long time but the nurse finally came in and gave me a pill for my blood pressure. Then the doctor came in. I was sent for a CAT scan (which the machine wasn't working right and it took about 20 minutes to fix then they had no-one to read the results so I was sent back to the E.R. and they took blood to run tests (which I later found out were drug tests because they assumed I was taking something because of the way I was acting.)

In the meantime my arm started to feel tingly and then I couldn't move it then my leg done the same, (I kept looking for the nurse, my daughter did also but no nurse no doctor) my son and husband arrived at the hospital and to make a long story short the doctor was going to send me home! My son told him he couldn't because I could no longer move my right side. I was finally transported to a larger hospital (I sat in the E.R. from 1pm until 8 pm.)  Once I got to the other hospital I was addmitted and we were told take I had 2 strokes while I was in the E.R! I was completely paralyzed on the right side. I now was facing my leg and my right hand (and I'm right handed) not working and slurred speech. Now unable to move the entire right side of my body I had to learn to do everything over again from walking and talking to tying my shoes and eating.

As I laid there and reviewed my life in my head, I thought..."This is not in my plan." Being paralyzed is simply not going to happen. I was in the hospital for over a month doing physical therapy. I can walk but have some difficulties with my leg not bending. I can use my arm and hand a little but have difficulties.

It has been a long journey but the stroke left me questioning many things in life. Your life can change in an instant and there is nothing you can do about it. Obviously I'm very lucky to be alive and doing as well as I am. I want more people to be aware anyone can have a stroke. Thanks to a loving family, friends and God I was able to make it through ok.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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