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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Babe & Jean
Babe & Jean
Caregiver & Family

Emily D.
Emily D.
Survivor

Valerie G-S
Valerie G-S
Survivor

Joseph B.


Family

Our lives were forever changed on March 8, 2008, the day of my dad's first stroke. After that, he suffered two more in just over two years. He passed away November 2010.

Before the first stroke, he was incredibly independent, active and fit. A former homebuilder, he was a jack of all trades. Others remember him as willing to help fix anything (even it if didn't really need to be). He loved participating in a variety of sports, yet his main passion was running. He ran up the Empire State Building, half marathons, shorter distances and on occasion ran with me. Courageous and never afraid to tackle life's challenges, his favorite saying was, "I was born ready," which helped him endure through all the strokes he had.

After the first one, he was quite mobile. His major loss was his car keys. Eighteen months later, the second stroke was hemorrhagic. His loss was his voice, hearing, dominant hand functionality and more vision impairments. With less mobility, he was still able to get around, run with me and remain a jokester. The third and last stroke, seven months later, took more and more of him, both physically and then mentally.

In and out of hospitals and rehabs, he continued to be the trooper he always was reminding us to be: tolerate others, recognize and support other's accomplishments, live life to its fullest and continue to preserve when times get difficult. "My champ" as I nicknamed him, will always remain a continual source of inspiration.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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