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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Babe & Jean
Babe & Jean
Caregiver & Family

Emily D.
Emily D.
Survivor

Valerie G-S
Valerie G-S
Survivor

Louis De La F.


Survivor

A Re-doable Brain

I had a stroke.

Left partial anterior circulation stroke. May 2010.

It meant that the right side of my body was affected. I veered to the right when walking. My mouth didn't work right on the right side. My right arm didn't have strength it used to. I couldn't lift my right leg far enough to get my trousers on.

But you wouldn't know it to look at me.

That's where the big difference lies. Aphasia "it sounds like a C S Lewis character in The Chronicles of Narnia" but it means a condition where the stroke has affected the person's ability to speak, read or write. You can't see it.

A stroke is a designer affliction: every person is affected differently. I've got two of the three. I can read, but speaking and writing I've got to work on. Then there's memory: I forget words. I like to refer to my life now as a crossword puzzle: some answers are apparent, some you have to search for.

This is ironic because I've spent my life talking and writing as a television news reporter, teacher of journalism and in public relations. I have some things left to do: finish my novel and resume my photography career.

I've detailed the stroke experience, and the re-doable effort in writing in a blog because I have now trained my right arm to do reasonable service on the keyboard and I know where to search. In some small way it may help others. In a large way it's helped me, giving me voice when a stroke took my speech away.

http://redoable.wordpress.com

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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