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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Kyle R.
Kyle R.
Survivor

Micah N.


Survivor

Micahs story

Babies and kids have strokes

Micah was our first born, a healthy baby boy in the summer of 2002 he was delivered by emergency c-section. He scored apgar of 9 and seemed healthy and happy but at 2 months of age had a bad reaction to an immunization and two weeks later starting showing signs of a stroke. I was not educated at that point that babies could have strokes and I wasn't sure why he stopped using his left hand, his left leg moved some what but I was more concerned of his clenched fist. I was recommended to see a pediatric neurologist and I made an appointment for Micah to be seen, the neurologist diagnosed him with herbs palsy but that diagnosis didn't sit well with me.

My friend recommended we go into childrens hospital to see the arm and hand specialist and in turn I made yet another appointment to see another doctor.
It took a few months to be seen but when we got into the office and was seen by the specialist he ran out of the office to grab another doctor, she was the head of the cerebral palsy clinic at Childrens.

The doctor wanted to run a battery of tests including an MRI.

We had the MRI about month later and that is when we discovered he had a middle cerebral infarct! I was in shock numb at the news how did my baby have a stroke I thought only elderly people had strokes.

Micah is 9 and doing fairly well with alot of love, therapy and doctors appointments!

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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