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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Lori K.
Lori K.
Survivor

Liane W.
Liane W.
Survivor

Richard H.
Richard H.
Family

Joy C. G.


Survivor

On February 19, 2009, just a week after my wife, Joy, turned 38, she got out of bed and while trying to walk to the bathroom, she lost the all of the feeling on her right side and she hit the floor. When I got by her side, she couldn't move or talk. I noticed the right side of her mouth was turned down and I feared it was a stroke so I called 911. In five minutes, EMTs swarmed our home and they also feared it was a stroke. When she got to the hospital where Joy worked as an RHIT, they completed an emergency MRI, but they had to put her to sleep so that she would stop fighting us. After the MRI, she was not able to breathe on her own, and the MRI indicated that she suffered a massive stroke to the base of her brain which completely shut down the entire left side of her brain. Because we didn't know exactly when the stroke took place, it was too risky for drug intervention. I asked the doctors if there was anything that they could do, and they said nothing, but PRAY! Joy was admitted into the Critical Care unit at CVMC, because she couldn't breathe, talk, or move her right side. I called my family and my pastor and we began praying. My minister came that night; he prayed and anointed her. The next day, she began to move her toes and later her fingers. After three days, she gained enough strength to be taken off of the ventilator and move out of CCU, but then was placed on a feeding tube. After another week, they moved her to the rehab floor and she began to relearn how to walk, talk and eat. After another three weeks, she was released from the hospital and allowed to come home. Joy had two months of out‐patient therapy and she has made dramatic improvements along the way. Now, almost two years later, she can walk and drive a car without any help. On the outside, it appears that she shows little‐to‐no visible signs that she had a stroke, but she still suffers from it and is not able to return to work.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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