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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Kyle R.
Kyle R.
Survivor

Sarah Elizabeth W.


Survivor

Sarah W. is a 32‐year-old stroke survivor living in Honolulu where she is active in a rehabilitation art program and attends classes at a community college to pursue her interest in environmental issues. Sarah suffered an intracerebral hemorrhage at the age of 25 from an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). She had had no symptoms to suggest the presence of an AVM other than occasional headaches. A graduate of Williams College, she was living in Boston, working as a research assistant at the Harvard Eating Disorders Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and preparing applications for Ph.D. programs in psychology. One morning when showering, she lost feeling on one side of her body. One of her roommates was running late that morning and was there to call an ambulance. She spent over four months recovering in Boston hospitals before returning to live with her mother in Honolulu. She has had the help of many physical, occupational and speech therapists in Boston, Honolulu and in southern California continuing her recovery from her stroke. She has also benefited from aqua therapy and from meditation and yoga. She has an active group of friends in Honolulu, and several gather with her every week at a restaurant for dinner. She connects with others on Facebook and writes an online blog about her rehabilitation, her art and her studies. An accompanying photo shows Sarah with some of her art work at a recent fundraiser for the rehabilitation art program.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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