Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Lauren C.
Lauren C.
Survivor

Lori K.
Lori K.
Survivor

Liane W.
Liane W.
Survivor

Nancy B.


Survivor

An independent woman's life was changed one day, and she's still working to regain that independence

For Nancy B., June 20, 2011, started out like any other day. She had the day off from her job as an insurance account manager, and she did some chores, ran some errands, and even took time out to go swimming.

About 6:30 in the evening, she decided to take her Schnauzer, Hunter, for his before-dinner walk. She didn't get far before she realized something was wrong. "I felt funny, like I just couldn't put one foot in front of the other." She turned around and went home, fed Hunter, and took a quick shower before calling her neighbor to ask for a ride to the emergency room.

When Nancy arrived at the ER, she told her friend to go back home and wait for her call while she found out whether she'd be staying or returning home. Just about the time the nurse fastened the hospital bracelet around her wrist, Nancy went blank. Her next memory was an ambulance ride from the hospital to a rehab facility seven days later.
Nancy had a stroke at age 61. Her right arm and leg were paralyzed and she couldn't form words. After nearly four months in rehab, she was ready for more independence. Although she had made great progress, she just wasn't ready to go home alone.

So she checked into the post-rehabilitation respite program at Cypress Palms Enhanced Assisted Living. "I'm getting outpatient physical therapy and occupational therapy in my apartment three times a week," she says, "and I also get the support and the personal care I still need at this point." Nancy's speech is greatly improved, and she is working on strengthening her legs so she can transfer herself more smoothly.

"If I were at home, I'd need someone to come in to cook and clean for me," she says. "In fact, I'd need someone nearby at all times to help me in and out of my wheelchair. But all that is taken care of here. I have a furnished apartment, the meals are great, and I have transportation available if I need to go somewhere."

Nancy has four girlfriends who visit her frequently at Cypress Palms. "They keep my spirits up and keep me motivated," she says. "They really do a lot--one even takes care of my dog and is looking after my house. But if I were at home, there's no way they could help me with everything I need. And my family is all up north. My goal is to go back home, but I'm just not quite there yet. And in the meantime, Cypress Palms is the perfect solution."

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo