Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Babe & Jean
Babe & Jean
Caregiver & Family

Emily D.
Emily D.
Survivor

Valerie G-S
Valerie G-S
Survivor

Jeffrey A. B.


Survivor

My husband, Jeff, suffered a massive stroke while on business in Michigan in April of 2008. I rushed to be with him and discovered on arriving at the hospital that my fun‐loving husband, a vegetarian for at least 20 years, my daily beach‐walking partner, the man who loved to travel the world and share his faith with those he met, had succumbed to the difficult‐to‐control hypertension he inherited from his mother. I was told to expect the worst, and on the third day after his stroke, Jeff required a hemicraniectomy to ease the pressure on his brain. I was told that he would likely never move his left leg or arm again. Thanks to the concerted effort of talented physical, occupational and speech therapists, Jeff was eventually stable enough to return to Florida after three months in Michigan. With continued therapy in Florida, he is now able to walk short distances with a cane and, slowly but surely, he's regaining sensation and movement in his left arm and hand. Unfortunately, it's been extremely difficult to keep him in the therapy that he needs to continue his miraculous improvement because the insurance companies and Medicare seem to feel that there is no room for improvement beyond the first six months to a year following a stroke. Jeff's recovery has been a testimony to his determination, positive attitude and faith and to the fact that recovery from stroke can continue for years, not just months.

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo