Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Lauren C.
Lauren C.
Survivor

Lori K.
Lori K.
Survivor

Liane W.
Liane W.
Survivor

Sam B.


Survivor

Sam and Ruth B. had just finished a wonderful August evening together along the shores of the Rappahannock River in eastern Virginia. It was the kind of trip that couples always dream about, and life was good. Sam began to feel ill soon after retiring for the evening. After calling to Ruth for help, Sam lost consciousness. Paramedics rushed Sam to a nearby community hospital. As Sam regained consciousness at the hospital, an attending physician in the emergency room (ER) determined that a medication Sam was taking may have contributed to a hemorrhagic stroke that was in progress. A Life Flight helicopter was dispatched with Sam on board for a journey that would see lifesaving procedures performed and Sam's ultimate survival. After a craniotomy and evacuation of a hematoma, Sam lived in a world of semi-consciousness and, as he describes it, "a blur" for the next 10 days. After several weeks in a Virginia hospital, Sam was discharged and ready to begin his rehabilitation in his hometown. Sam participated in an inpatient rehabilitation program for one month followed by outpatient rehab from October through February 2009. Sam and Ruth worked tirelessly to help Sam regain his independence. Today, Sam has returned to coaching golf, singing in his church choir and driving. He is an active participant in area charity functions and is one of our local “Stroke Celebrities” and a true inspiration to others.

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo