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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bernard R.
Bernard R.
Survivor

Elizabeth H.
Elizabeth H.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Roger H.


Survivor

Roger, proud grandfather of five, Harley rider and US Army Special Forces Vietnam Veteran, had his life change dramatically weeks after his 59th birthday when he suffered a massive ischemic stroke. From the beginning, when chances of survival were slim, Roger demonstrated a determination to not only survive the stroke, but never give up. After nearly six months in various hospital/rehab settings, Roger began therapy for the paralysis of his entire left side and left neglect.

Roger has encouraged others to obtain health screenings and incorporate preventative measures. His positive attitude throughout his negative experience has influenced others tremendously. For example, while residing at the Veteran's Hospital during a Christmas breakfast gathering (using his one good arm and in his wheelchair), Roger helped a young Iraq war veteran and an elderly WWII veteran with their meals and put smiles on their faces with a joke. The observers had tears in their eyes as they witnessed the "true meaning of Christmas." As I see Roger's dedication and ability to remain positive during his struggle to learn to walk again and attempt to move his arm, I am very proud to be by his side as his wife for the journey. We believe that the stroke happened for a reason, and we may continue to help others by our actions. Roger is an excellent example of a "Stroke Survivor,” by all he exemplifies: advocacy, positivity, dedication, endurance, volunteerism and helpfulness.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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