Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Elizabeth H.
Elizabeth H.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Shannon Melinda A.


Survivor

In May 2004, Shannon was a bright honor student happily anticipating her high school prom and graduation, five weeks away. The summer promised to be full of lifeguarding and band camp for the James Madison University Marching Dukes, where she would be attending college. However, an undiagnosed Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM ‐ a tangle of arteries and veins) in her brain ruptured and caused a massive stroke that paralyzed her right side and destroyed part of her speech center. She had to relearn to walk, talk, move her right arm, basic math and computers, as well as deal with a new, difficult to control seizure disorder. Yet, after months of intense therapy and two brain surgeries, her "puzzle of life" was once again nearly finished. She was driving and taking a few college classes. In March 2005, a brain aneurysm developed inside her AVM and ruptured. Suddenly, her "nearly completed 500 piece puzzle was 1,000 fragmented pieces with no picture as a guide.” This time, recovery has been slow and tortuous. Shannon has minimal function of her right arm and fingers, difficulty with word finding and short term memory problems. But always, she perseveres, never giving up. And while her path may be full of obstacles, she persists. After five or so years of hard work, she will graduate from a university this May. Her one wish? That people "would understand that stroke also happens to young people and how a brain injury affects all aspects of your life.”

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo