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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Mary C.


Survivor

I had my first stroke on September 29, 1999. The day before the stroke I was a teacher of Language Arts for sixth graders. The day after, I couldn't say a word, nor move my right arm, my right hand, or right leg. In the next few days I said "Tony". That's my husband's name, but that's the only word I could say so I repeated it over and over again.

Then came "wow" and my world was filled with "Tony" and "wow"!      

From the beginning I was frustrated.  Something was missing in my brain. After three months, my therapy ended due to my insurance. During these years, I got slowly better. I spoke so slowly, and the worst part was that I spoke words that didn't fit my thoughts. I would say, "I love you", when what I meant to say was, "Thank you" or "have a nice day" or even "good-bye".  I would say "you have a prominent face" when I really meant to say "you have a familiar face". I really thought I could get in on a conversation, but by the time I would think of it, the conversation changed and I was left holding the "bag" of yesteryear's conversation.

I became so embarrassed, so foolish, that I preferred not to speak at all.     

Today, I think a new life has been given to me; one that includes aphasia and how I deal with communicating my thoughts, my words, and my actions in a world that advances so much every day.  I had a stroke 11 years ago. For nearly three years, I have found a warmth and understanding at the Stroke Comeback Center. I can't speak freely, but I have come a long way.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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