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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Kyle R.
Kyle R.
Survivor

Sara C.


Survivor

In 2006 I experienced a stroke at the ripe old age of 26. I lost all feeling and voluntary muscle control on my right side, like a line had been drawn right down the middle of my body. After about two weeks in the hospital I was walking "normal" (but hesitant), and all sensation returned except for to my face and hand. It feels like half of my lips are "puffy" and I have Band-Aids on my fingertips.

In addition, I acquired a funny little tremor in my right hand about a month after the stroke, making fine motor tasks even more challenging. Prior to all this happening, I was enjoying an exciting career making television game shows so I was forced to reorganize my priorities, and choose a path that would provide consistent medical benefits and not be hindered by my hand deficits (though I'm a firm believer in neuroplasticity, and work hard every day to incorporate my right hand in all activities).

Realizing that I have my whole life ahead of me, and that many others can benefit from my unique knowledge and spunky attitude, I chose a second career that will truly impact other stroke survivors, and can also utilize my creative experiences from the game show world... Occupational Therapy! After I graduate with my Master's in 2012, I hope to teach others to advocate for themselves and solve problems independently, as well as explore product design to make the world functional for all ability levels.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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