Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Francis M.

Francis M.
Francis M.

Survivor

As a retired Special Agent of the FBI, I am in my second career as a high school math teacher. I had a stroke on October 14, 2010, minutes before I was to leave for work. I had double vision, was unable to walk by myself, and my speech was garbled. My wife called 911. My left eye was drooped. My blood pressure was 188 over 100.

I was transported to a hospital in New Haven, CT. I had a CAT Scan of the head to see if I was bleeding, and it came back negative. They then gave me an IV insert into each arm in case I needed to be injected with anything. They gave me the drug TPA by IV. I was then given an MRI of the brain - this indicated that I had had previous strokes (this was news to me). I was transferred to the stroke intensive care ward, where I was checked every 15 minutes for the first six hours, followed by checks every half hour for six hours, then every 45 minutes for six hours, followed by every hour for 6 hours. I was checked by the physical therapist and occupational therapist, went for a short walk with them and was told that "I was the healthiest person on the floor." The neurologist and staff there told me that I should be the poster boy for the stroke unit there, because I had no side effects from the stroke.  I was discharged on October 16, 2010.

» Learn more about Stroke Risk Factors

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo