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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Elizabeth H.
Elizabeth H.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Edee T.


Survivor

In 2004, at the age of 39, I went to a doctor for one year telling him I didn't feel well. I was told it was depression and put on medication. One day my indigestion was so bad that I went to the ER, only to be told that I needed a stress test because my ekg was abnormal. After this, I had an arteriogram and was told that I had 70% blockage of widow maker and proceeded to have open heart surgery. I had a graft, and then two months later had to have two stents because it re blocked. 

One year later, I was at work and had a headache, I went to speak and couldn't, and my left arm and leg were numb. I was rushed to the hospital. My three children came into the ER and my youngest was crying. I tried to say, "It's okay," and I couldn't! I was a prisoner in my own body. I couldn't raise my leg or arm. It was horrible... It was worse than my open heart.

I had to learn to speak and walk again. My children said I sounded like Dori on Finding Nemo. My short term memory was affected, and this can be so frustrating for myself and others. I can no longer calculate, which made my career in radiology cease. At times, what is so simple to others is so difficult for me. I have recovered in many ways and I thank God for that. I want for others to not be afraid for them to make their doctors listen.

I want to be the voice I once lost.

» Learn more about the Warning Signs of Stroke

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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