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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Carlos P.


Survivor

October 16, 2009 was a scary moment not only for me, but for my family as well. I went to my girlfriend's house to install kitchen cabinets. One of my friends was by my side when a severe headache hit. It felt like someone was drilling through my brain. I figured that it was just a random headache, but this turned out to be much more than just that. I held my head in my hands and knelt on the kitchen floor. My friend noticed that I went down shaking and that my face had gotten pale. At that moment my girlfriend walked into the kitchen, and when she saw me down on my knees she asked what had happened. I told her that I had a severe headache, and she told me to go take a shower and relax. No more work for tonight.

That night I had trouble sleeping, and the bright lights began to bother me. I went back to my house and the headache was still there. The next morning I woke up and went to the Virginia Hospital Emergency Room. The doctor took X rays, and they came back positive. The doctor said that I had an aneurysm on the left side of my brain. Two blood vessels had broken apart in my head, and caused bleeding. I was shipped out to the Virginia Manhattan Hospital for surgery. They had to put a filter in my chest... I was a mess. Now I am managing my health by taking a blood thinner medication.

Here I am 15 months later, learning how to walk, talk, and feel. The doctors say that this process is slow, but I am doing well. The Lord gave me a second chance.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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