Text Size

A A A

Search


 


Faces of Stroke - Logo 100px  transparent

Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Lori K.
Lori K.
Survivor

Liane W.
Liane W.
Survivor

Richard H.
Richard H.
Family

Susan L.


Caregiver

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, affects more than 2 million Americans, including Helmut Huber, the husband of award-winning actress Susan Lucci. When they found out Helmut had AFib, their first question was, “what is it?” His doctor told them AFib is a type of irregular heartbeat that can increase his risk of stroke nearly five-fold, but the good news was that his risk of stroke can be significantly reduced.

From that point forward, Susan and Helmut pledged to learn everything they could to understand AFib and to work with his doctor to manage it. They also work as a team to ensure he’s doing everything possible to reduce his risk of stroke, whether that means attending doctor’s appointments together, researching the condition or asking questions about his personal risk of stroke.

Reducing Helmut’s risk of stroke is important to Susan and they both wish there had been more information available when he was first diagnosed with AFib. In order to help educate America about AFib and increase awareness about the condition and its link to stroke, Susan and Helmut are now serving as program ambassadors for Facing AFib, Get Serious About Stroke™. Through the program, they are encouraging everyone touched by AFib to visit www.FacingAFib.com and join them in taking the Facing AFib Pledge to learn more about AFib and discuss ways to reduce AFib-related stroke with a doctor.

Learn more about Facing AFib.

 

All active news articles
Share in FacebookLinkedInTwitter
Share on Facebook
Cancel
Share on MySpace
Cancel
Share on Twitter
A short URL will be added to the end of your Tweet.

Cancel
Share on LinkedIn
Cancel

Share by

Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

Printer Friendly Version

National Stroke Awareness logo

Faces of Stroke

National Stroke Association

1-800-STROKES
1-800-787-6537
9707 E. Easter Lane, Suite B
Centennial, CO 80112
info@stroke.org

Stroke Help Line logo