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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Elizabeth H.
Elizabeth H.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Kevin B.

Kevin and Family
Kevin and Family

Survivor

A Second Chance!

It was Saturday, April 12, 2010. I had arrived home from a flight from Florida and asked my family if I could take a quick nap before we went out to eat. I told them to wake me up in 30 minutes and we would go. I remember my daugther, who was 5 at the time, waking me up and walking through the house holding my hand as we were leaving to go eat. My wife and son, who was 2 at the time, was in front of us.

The next thing I remember was looking at a paramedic who I had known for a long time. As a fulltime firefighter/EMT, I knew most of the paramedics in the county. I still could not understand why she was at my house. There are bits of pieces that I remember over the next couple of days but most of it is a blur. The thing that stands out in my mind the most is the doctor standing over me in ICU telling me that I had a massive stroke and was on my second day in ICU. I could have understood a heart attack, but a stroke was the last thing on my mind. I had ran into plenty of stroke patients in my career, and at the age of 32, I was not the norm for a stroke patient.

I spent a total of 4 days in ICU followed by 2 more days in a regular room. I was told to return in a week for heart surgery to close a PFO they had discovered while I was in ICU. All I could think about was my kids, my wife, my career and my second chance at life.

A little over a year later, my wife found me passed out on top of our son in a seizure and doctors determined it was a side effect from the stroke. Besides some remaining residual side effects from the stroke, I am doing good.

Learn more about PFO.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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