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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Bernard R.
Bernard R.
Survivor

Elizabeth H.
Elizabeth H.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Roger H.

Ray Bey and Gramp
Ray Bey and Gramp

Survivor

Stroke Survivor and his "therapy" pet

I came to live with my family after my adoptive dad (Gramp) had a massive stroke. Gramp was determined to survive and regain control of his left side paralysis, and always talked about having a cat of his own. Encouraged by the doctors and therapists, since studies show pets are great therapy for stroke survivors, as well as caregivers, to relieve stress & offer motivation and affection, once Gramp returned home, my adoptive parents got on a list with an ocicat breeder. My name was given to me before I was born, so I have always been called "Ray Bey". Ray is a family name and Bey is for the Montagnard interpreter Gramp had while serving in the US Army Special Forces. Due to Gramp being on Warfarin for the stroke, I was declawed in the front so I couldn't scratch him and cause more problems. Every day I help Gramp with his home therapy he uses his left arm to play with me I chase toys that he throws and bring them back to do again. I also snuggle with him to take a nap. In the nice weather we go outside for walks (I walk with a leash beside his wheelchair) and we have picnics in the park where we soak up the sunshine. Although not the traditional "Face of Stroke", I am happy to be a part of recovery therapy caused by the devastation of stroke for both the survivor and caregiver in my adoptive family.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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