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Jodi C.
Jodi C.
Survivor

Tracey E.
Tracey E.
Survivor

Shannon A.
Shannon A.
Family

Bob B.
Bob B.
Survivor

Owen R.
Owen R.
Survivor

Gayzella W.


Survivor

In The Gym

I encountered a mini stroke in the gym while weight lifting on 9 November 2013. I didn't think it was possible because of my age and fitness level. I realized largest that a stroke has no rhyme or reason for choosing is victems.

The week of November 9th I hadn't felt very well but attributed a series of dizzy spells and nausea to anemia. On Saturday 9 November I was surprised that I awoke feeling great. Since I had been sick all week I decided to go to the gym to do light weight lifting. 5 minutes into my routine I was completely spent, panting, clamy, sweating and dizzy. I grabbed a bar next to me right before I went head first towards a pair of racked barbells. My right hand held on and I slid down to the floor hunched over.

I had no idea why I felt so out of breath and why the dizziness had progressed. I thought to myself "I'm having a medical alert". I tried to call for help but could not speak. My eyes rolled back and I could not pen them no matter how hard I tried. I began to throw up on myself and people around me realized that something was wrong. All I could think was that I was dying.

I later learned that I had a mini stroke that caused damage to both sides of my cerebellum. The recovery is progressing with some setbacks but I am determined to work hard and succeed. Strokes have no rhyme or reason for who they choose to attack. Positive thinking after a stroke makes all of the difference in recovery.

 

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Display of the Faces of Stroke stories does not imply National Stroke Association's endorsement of any product, treatment, service or entity. National Stroke Association strongly recommends that people ask a healthcare professional about diagnosis and treatment questions before using any product, treatment or service. The views expressed through the stories reflect those of the authors and do not reflect the opinion of National Stroke Association.

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Faces of Stroke

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